Dr. John Lamberton, Clinical Sociologist
PUTTING SOCIOLOGY TO WORK

INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

VIRTUAL COURSE SYLLABUS
FALL SEMESTER 2020

      Proprietary Lecture Notes
 

COURSE INFORMATION:

Start Date: 8/17/2020
End Date:  12/13/2020
Format:  I am committed to achieving the academic mission of building student success through quality education, especially during these challenging and stressful times. Please discuss any and all concerns about completing remote coursework and with me as soon as you realize that your concerns may negatively impact your course performance. 

HOW TO CONTACT ME:
Professor
:  Dr.  John Lamberton

Email: drj@drjohnlamberton.com  My email is sent directly to my smart phone with an alert for student emails so that I may correspond with you quickly.  I normally attempt to return student emails within several hours (it may be a few minutes); but occasionally my response could take up to six to twelve hours.
Office
Hours: You may schedule times to meet with me on demand.  Personal Zoom meetings are always available.

HOW TO CONTACT MY SUPERVISOR

 

Microsoft Office

You will need Microsoft Office software(Word, Excel, PowerPoint, etc.).

TEXTBOOKS, SUPPLIES, & OTHER RESOURCES:

Required Textbook(s)

ONLINE TEXT:  Sociology: Understanding and Changing the Social World

Publisher: University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing

This textbook is an Open Education Resource book, which means it is free for you to access at the following link: https://open.lib.umn.edu/sociology/  No purchase is necessary.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

All college courses have “learning outcomes,” which is jargon for the specific things you’re supposed to learn. Below are the Institutional Learning outcomes and Program learning outcomes, which I’m required to include on my syllabus but which you don’t have to read. You should, however, pay attention to the Course Outcomes.

Course Learning Outcomes:

1.  Examine social interaction the the Dyad.
2.  Compare and contrast major theoretical perspectives in Sociology. 
3.  Analyze research methods used to study social life. 

4
.  Explain major issues related to social inequalities. 
5.  Evaluate the role of social institutions in society. 
6.  Apply key concepts to culture, socialization, deviance, and social change. 
7.  Defend sociological arguments with scholarly evidence.
8.  Study and learn how to “Put Sociology to Work” in the private sector.

To help you study and learn the importance of understanding course outcomes, I will provide instructional supplements and videos, lead class discussions and lectures, post weekly announcements, comment extensively on your work, and meet individually during conferences and as needed.  My teaching philosophy, posted in Blackboard, can help you get to know my teaching style.  My teaching style and methods, though, are not nearly as important as your learning strategies. You should plan to take notes over assigned readings, videos, and lectures; participate earnestly in class activities; begin working on summaries and essays well in advance of the due date; revise and edit your work carefully; and, if you’re struggling, seek help me.

Program (Sociology Department & Liberal Arts) Learning Outcomes:

 

Institutional (UCO) Learning Outcomes:

University of Central Oklahoma graduates’ value cultural diversity, ethical behavior, and the unique role of public education in sustaining a free society. The following institutional learning outcomes function independently and in concert. UCO graduates demonstrate: 1. Communication Skills; 2. Critical Thinking; 3. Personal Responsibility; and 4. Social Responsibility.

TEACHING METHODS:

Your input is welcomed and appreciated through class discussions.  Our instruction will include lectures, group discussion, presentations, journaling, quizzes, small group work, and formal workshops (guest speakers).  In small group sessions, you will discuss reading and course assignments, practice applications of new concepts, and perform critical thinking exercises. You are expected to participate in the class student-learning community and to master independent study during the semester.  Your Assignments are scheduled in PLAYBOOK (course schedule) posted on Blackboard.  You will be regularly assessed over course material through metrics that may include exit surveys, formal exams, unannounced quizzes, journal writing assignments, class projects, presentations, class discussions, class participation and attendance. 

GRADING POLICY AND ASSIGNMENT LIST:

Your grade will be scored using the following Assessment Metrics:

(1)  GAMEPLAN

You should create and maintain a pdf file on your computer saved as “GAMEPLAN.” Publish a thoughtful and creative GAMEPLAN file first page for your file. Which will be your own creation.  It may include items such as a single or multiple photograph(s), a collage of some type and/or your own art work.  The GAMEPLAN file first page can be black and white or color.  You may change your GAMEPLAN file first page anytime you wish.  In fact, changing your GAMEPLAN file first page is encouraged.  The GAMEPLAN file first page should also contain three lines of typing along with your visual creation.  The first line should read "GAMEPLAN."  The second line should read "Introduction to Sociology."  The third line should include your name. 

The GAMEPLAN pdf file should be divided into these sections: CUMULATIVE GRADE, GRADED ASSIGNMENTS, SYLLABUS, READING SCHEDULE, CALENDAR, NOTES, HAND-OUTS, AND CAMPUS SERVICES FLIERS.  You will store your course content in GAMEPLAN. 

You should email your GAMEPLAN pdf file to me by the dates specified on the PLAYBOOK COURSE SCHEDULE.  I will evaluate your GAMEPLAN file at the end of each quarter of the semester for quality, content, appearance, organization and completeness.  The evaluations are worth a maximum of 25 points each.  The total score possible for the GAMEPLAN file is 200 points.  The GAMEPLAN file can be used as a reference during each four scheduled Formal Exams. 

The GAMEPLAN file measures competencies in note-taking, information organization, acquiring and evaluating information, organizing and maintaining files, time management, comprehension and reliability.

(2)  CLASS PARTICIPATION

Class Participation includes completing class projects and discussions that occur every class period when we analyze sociological topics.  You should regularly and actively participate in class discussions.  You will participate in small discussion groups during the semester for you to experience a more personal instructional strategy with your classmates.  You may score points through my evaluation of your informed participation. These points will be posted on Blackboard at least twice during the semester: at the midpoint and in the last week of the semester before final exams.  Class Participation is worth 100 points.  Class Participation measures competencies in acquiring and evaluating information, comprehension and reliability and social skills.

(3) WRITING ASSIGNMENTS:  JOURNALING

Many famous creatives, writers, innovators and original thinkers keep journals.  For many, it is a creative necessity.  For some, it is a way to reduce stress or focus thoughts.  For others, it is a place for exploration.  For some, it is an art form.  You will learn to journal assignments in this class.  There are twelve short writing assignments called Journals. (https://medium.com/thrive-global/start-journaling-54ea2edb104)  Each Journal Assignment is worth a maximum of 20 points.  Journaling measures competencies in note-taking, information organization, acquiring and evaluating information, organizing and maintaining files, time management, comprehension and reliability, listening, memory, and time management.

(4) CLASS PRESENTATION

You are also required to give a 5 to 7-minute PRESENTATION using a visual aid such as Power Point, Presi, Emaze or other visual computer-based application. using sociological concepts to analyze a current topic or event.  We will review the terms of an acceptable PRESENTATION and schedule your PRESENTATION during first few weeks of the semester.  There are absolutely no make-ups if you do not give your PRESENTATION when scheduled.

If a scheduling conflict arises before the date of your PRESENTATION, you should contact me to reschedule your PRESENTATION at a more convenient time. (The discretion for granting a rescheduled PRESENTATION rests solely with me.)  Your PRESENTATION is scored at a maximum of 100 points and measures competencies in critical thinking, information organization, communication, and presenting information in a social situation.

(5) UNANNOUNCED ASSIGNMENTS & QUIZZES

There may be other short unannounced assignments and Exit Quizzes covering the material in the text and presented in class. If you are absent the day of an unannounced assignment or are absent on a day when an assignment is due, you will not receive full credit unless the absence was an Excused Absence.  Excused Absences may be granted by emailing a notice of a proposed absence to me before the absence occurs.  However, assignments may always be submitted before the due date.  Journaling and pop quizzes measure competencies in listening, memory, and time management.

(6)  EXAMS

There will be four EXAMS during the semester that will be made up of objective questions including True-False, Multiple Choice and Fill-in-the-Blank and short answer questions.  You may score up to 100 points on each EXAM.  Although the Final EXAM will cover the final 25% of course content, it will also contain questions covering all of the material presented during the semester.  There will be Reviews before each scheduled EXAM.  You may use your class notes on each of the EXAMS.  FORMAL EXAMS measure competencies in memory, information organization, note-taking, critical thinking and test-taking. 

(7)  ADDITIONAL ASSIGNMENTS: EXTRA CREDIT

There may be extra credit assignments scheduled intermittently during the semester.  EXTRA POINTS may include but not limited to information presented by representatives from a variety of TCC Campus Services such as the Campus Police, Reading and Writing Center, Library, Student Life, etc.  EXTRA POINTS are worth 5 to 25 points per assignment depending upon the rigors of the task.

(8)  LATE ASSIGNMENTS AND MAKE-UP WORK

I must approve the submission of Late Assignments in writing at least 24 hours before the Assignment due date or else Late Assignments will not be accepted under any circumstances.  Please to not try to seek approval for taking late tests or submitting late assignments outside of the prescribed terms of the Syllabus.  Approved late Assignments will not be accepted after one week past the Assignment due date under any circumstances.  The maximum score for Late Assignments will be automatically discounted by 50% except in cases of extreme emergency, such as death in the family, auto wreck, severe illness, etc. 

It is advised that should an unforeseeable problem (that could interfere with class performance) occur, notify the instructor so that alternate arrangements may be made for attendance and course assignments.  The material accompanying the text and handouts should be treated as required reading and may be included in the class discussion and exams. You are, therefore, responsible for all assigned text reading, as well as all the information that is discussed or otherwise included in class.  You should be aware of all assignment, presentation, and exam dates that are listed in the accompanying calendar without reminder from the instructor.  You are expected to be prepared (completed assigned readings) to discuss pertinent topics each class period as scheduled.  You who attend class unprepared should expect your grades to be negatively affected as a result. All assignments are to be turned in at the beginning of class on the date due unless otherwise instructed.  Any assignment handed in late on the date due will receive no credit unless prior arrangements have been made with me to submit a late assignment.  There are no exceptions.  

(9)  TENTATIVE COURSE SCHEDULE ON PLAYBOOK

All Course Content, Assessment Metrics, and Assignment/Exam due dates can be found on PLAYBOOK on drjohnlamberton.com.  Like the main Syllabus, PLAYBOOK Is a living document that I may amend at any time during the semester.

I intend to positively guide each of you through the remainder of the semester on PLAYBOOK.  However, if you have concerns, you may always email me with your questions.  I cannot begin to emphasize how seriously you should regard the remainder the semester in Introductory Sociology.  Carelessness and lack of attention to detail will adversely affect your course grade. 

COURSE DIVISION: FOUR SEGMENTS

The course content and assessment metrics are divided into four sections for the semester.  The dates for the end of each segment are posted on PLAYBOOK. 

WEEKLY COURSE REVIEWS

You should review the text, your reading assignments, your notes and your assessment metrics during weekly blocks of time that you pre-schedule on your GAMEPLAN calendar.

(1) Monday Status Report - Review the learning objectives scheduled for the new week.

(2) Friday Status Report - Review your attendance, your participation in class, assessment metrics and the course content that was presented during the week. 

ESTMATED TOTAL POSSIBLE COURSE POINTS

1.     GAMEPLAN pdf file:                 200

2.     Attendance                                100

3.     Journals (12@20 Pts)               240

4.     Presentation                              200

5.     Class Participation                    100

6.     Exams                                         400

7.     Exit Polls (10@20pts)              200

8.     Weekly Reviews (15@10pts)  150

9.      Estimated Extra Points              60

10.     Estimated Total Points        1650

COURSE GRADING:

A = 90 – 100%.        

B = 80 – 89%.          

C = 70 – 79%.          

D = 60 – 69%.          

F = 59% or less.       

MEANING OF LETTER GRADES

A:  Earned by work whose excellent quality indicates a full mastery of the subject and course assignments are of extraordinary distinction. 

B:  Earned by work that indicates a good comprehension of the course material, a good command of the skills needed to work with the course material, and the student’s full engagement with the course requirements and activities.

C:  Earned by work that indicates an adequate and satisfactory, comprehension of the course material and the skills needed to work with the course material and indicates the student has met basic requirements for completing assigned work and participating in class activities.

D:  Earned by work that is unsatisfactory but that indicates some minimal command of the course materials and some minimal participation in class activities that is worthy of course credit.

F:  Earned by work that is unsatisfactory and unworthy of course credit.

ATTENDANCE/PARTICIPATION:

By enrolling in this course as a college student, you have accepted the adult responsibility of attending every class period during the entire semester.  Your CLASS ATTENDANCE will be recorded for every class period.  There are a very few exceptions for non-attendance, i.e., personal sickness, family illness where you are the primary care-giver, pregnancy or emergency child-care, and funerals of close family members or friends.  Regular, consistent attendance and participation are required and essential to be successful in this course.  If you accumulate four or more unexcused absences, the final grade may be reduced a minimum of one-letter grade and/or you may be automatically administratively withdrawn from the course depending upon the circumstances.  Unexcused absences are absences for which you do not inform me of your impending absence by email before the absence occurs.  You may obtain an excused absence by emailing me about your absence prior to the class absence unless there is an extreme emergency which necessitates sending me an email after the absence.  Class Attendance is scored by your official attendance record, the Class Attendance Score Sheet and maybe worth a maximum of 100 points.  Attendance and participation measure competencies in reliability, dependability, goal setting, time management, critical thinking and social interaction. 

LATE ARRIVAL

You should be seated in class and ready to study when class begins.  If you determine that you are unable to arrive in class on time, you should contact me immediately.  If you are late to class on more than one occasion, you will be asked not to enter the classroom until you can arrive on time.  You are responsible for your class performance and course responsibilities.  After two late arrivals, five points per late arrival will be deducted from your final score.

IN-CLASS STUDENT CONDUCT

The purpose of this information is to assist you in understanding proper classroom behavior. The classroom should be a learning-centered environment in which faculty and students are unhindered by disruptive behavior. You are a college student and are expected to act in a mature manner and to be respectful of the learning process, your instructor and your fellow students. Faculty members have the authority to manage their classrooms to ensure an environment conducive to learning.

Any person who shall accept the privilege extended by Oklahoma laws of attendance or employment at any state college, state junior college or state university shall by so attending or working at such institution be deemed to have given consent to the policies of the institution, the Board of Trustees and the laws of this state. Such policies shall include prohibition against disruptive activities at state institutions of higher learning.

Take responsibility for your education. There is a common myth among some students that because they pay tuition, they deserve to receive unearned credit for the class. This is not true. In fact, you pay only a portion of the cost of your education; taxpayers pay the balance. Instructors are here to create a learning environment. Whether you learn in college depends on your willingness to listen, ask appropriate questions and do the work necessary to pass the course. College courses are rigorous and demanding; you may have to work harder and seek more help in order to succeed.

ONLINE LIVE STUDENT CONDUCT

For ONLINE LIVE classes, students are expected to have their camera turned on during the scheduled class time and to participate in online class activities, just as they would in a face-to-face class. If you anticipate problems with internet access or internet speed, or if you can’t get a camera and microphone, you might be better off in an asynchronous online class. In addition, please observe the following practices:

·       Use your computer or a tablet device, not your phone, to attend online classes.

·       Keep yourself on mute during lectures and while others are speaking.

·       Try to find a distraction-free place to log onto class, but don’t worry about anyone in your household (including pets!) appearing in the background; just do your best to stay focused.

·       If you have to turn off the video for a bit, that’s okay, just as it’s okay if you have to leave a classroom every once in a while; most of the time, though, video needs to be on. 

·       Be aware of the documents and applications you have open on your device, in case you need to share your screen.

·       If you feel more comfortable using a virtual background, please choose something that is not distracting.

·       Make sure to log in using your real name—first and last—so that I can count you present.

 

The virtual classroom is a new experience for all of us, so if you have problems, please contact me as soon as possible. I will work with you to find solutions.

 

COURSE WITHDRAWAL:

Please discuss your personal or academic situation with me or Cindy McCachern at Deer Creek HS before making a decision to withdraw from this course.  Students may be administratively withdrawn for excessive absences.

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY:

Academic Integrity is a foundational value of TCC and students are expected to behave as responsible members of the college community and to be honest and ethical in their academic work. The Academic Integrity link details guidelines for academic integrity, as well as forms of academic dishonesty. In case of academic dishonesty (plagiarism), the following penalties will apply: (1) the assignment or test will receive an automatic grade of zero points, or (2) depending upon the offense, a grade of “F” will be assigned to the offending student for the semester.

Academic Dishonesty is one of the worst transgressions that you can commit in college and the impact of academic dishonesty may follow you throughout your college career.  This link provides access to guidelines for academic integrity, as well as forms of academic dishonesty.  Read this information very carefully.  There is no excuse for you to engage in accidental plagiarism. 

CHEATING

Academic Dishonesty (Cheating) is defined as the deception of others about one’s own work or about the work of another.  Academic dishonesty or misconduct is not condoned nor tolerated at any college or university system.  Academic dishonesty is behavior in which a deliberately fraudulent misrepresentation is employed to gain underserved intellectual credit, either for oneself or for another.  Academic misconduct is behavior that results in intellectual advantage obtained by violating specific standard, but without deliberate intent or use of fraudulent means.  All colleges and universities adopt policies delegating certain forms of authority for disciplinary action to the faculty. Such disciplinary actions delegated to the faculty include, but are not limited to, the dismissal of disrespectful or disorderly students from classes. In the case of academic dishonesty, a faculty member may require the student to redo an assignment or test, or require the student to complete a substitute assignment or test;  record a "zero" for the assignment or test in question; recommend to the student that the student withdraw from the class, or administratively withdraw the student from the class; record a grade of "F" for the student at the end of the semester.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

Each student is responsible for being aware of the information contained in the UCO Catalog, the Student Handbook, and the Academic Calendar. All information may be viewed on the TCC website.

ACCESSIBILITY RESOURCES STATEMENT  

Considering the transition to an online/remote format, I have made every effort to make this course accessible to all students, including students with disabilities. If you encounter a problem accessing anything in this course, please contact me immediately by email so that I can support you. You may also contact TCC’s Accessibility Resources at 918.595.7115 (Voice) or by email ar@tulsacc.edu.  Deaf and hard of hearing students may text 918.809.1864, or email rcdhh@tulsacc.edu. 

CHANGES TO THE SYLLABUS & POLICY ADJUSTMENT

Occasionally, when genuine emergencies or problem situations occur, the course policies outlined here can be modified to help a student complete the course if the student has completed most assigned work and is earning at least a "C." It is always in your best interest, therefore, to contact me immediately if a crisis situation prevents you from attending class or completing assignments.

TECHNICAL CONSIDERATIONS

The following technology is required for participation in this course:

  • Computer with a built-in or external USB webcam and microphone.

  • Microsoft Office.

  • Chrome/Firefox – free downloads.

  • A reliable internet connection.

   STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Students are expected to check the course on BLACKBOARD and their TCC student email account daily.

  • Students are expected to have the following computer skills:

    • Word processing including formatting word processor documents

    • Email including sending, receiving and email attachments
    • Internet searches
    • TCC library database searches
  • Students must keep their anti-virus definitions up to date

 

ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY

If you are a military student with the potential of being called to military service or training during the course of the semester, you are encouraged to contact your course instructor no later than the first week of class to discuss the class attendance policy.

RELIGIOUS ACCOMMODATIONS

Students are expected to notify their instructor in advance if they intend to miss class to observe a holy day pertaining to their religious faith. Students may be required to provide verifiable documentation to the faculty either prior to missing or upon their return to class.

PREGNANT STUDENTS

TCC does not discriminate against any student on the basis of pregnancy. Pregnant students seeking accommodations should contact me immediately.

COMPUTER ACCESS

Continuous computer access is mandatory for succeeding in the course. The text and most of the class content is posted on the internet.  When assignments are posted or textbook chapters assigned through Blackboard, it's your responsibility to make sure you have access to that information.  If you do not have computer access at home, computer access is available at each campus of TCC.

TIME COMMITMENT

Introduction to Sociology is a three-credit hour course.  Studies indicate that, on average, for every one hour of course credit, you should expect to spend two hours of outside time on course work per week i.e., reading, homework, discussion, studying etc.  For this course, that means a minimum of six hours of outside time per week.  Some students may spend more, depending on their level of expertise.

CLASSROOM CONDUCT & STUDENT BEHAVIOR GUIDELINES 

The purpose of this information is to assist you in understanding proper classroom behavior. The classroom should be a learning-centered environment in which faculty and students are unhindered by disruptive behavior. You are a college student and are expected to act in a mature manner and to be respectful of the learning process, your instructor and your fellow students. Faculty members have the authority to manage their classrooms to ensure an environment conducive to learning.

Any person who shall accept the privilege extended by Oklahoma laws of attendance or employment at any state college, state junior college or state university shall by so attending or working at such institution be deemed to have given consent to the policies of the institution, the Board of Trustees and the laws of this state. Such policies shall include prohibition against disruptive activities at state institutions of higher learning.

Take responsibility for your education. There is a common myth among some students that because they pay tuition, they deserve to receive unearned credit for the class. This is not true. In fact, you pay only a portion of the cost of your education; taxpayers pay the balance. Instructors are here to create a learning environment. Whether you learn in college depends on your willingness to listen, ask appropriate questions and do the work necessary to pass the course. College courses are rigorous and demanding; you may have to work harder and seek more help in order to succeed.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

There may be announcements about procedures or assignments made in this class distributed through a course group email or on this website under Announcements.

LIBRARY

SENSITIVE MATERIALS STATEMENT

Higher education fosters intellectual and personal growth through exposure to and interaction with a wide range of ideas, creative expressions, and information. You can expect to think critically about ideas and perspectives which may be very different from your own.  The information may be outside the range of your personal moral standards. The information may be challenging or uncomfortable. If you do not feel comfortable discussing your concerns in class, you are encouraged to immediately discuss any questions or concerns you may have about course materials with me. 

INCLUSIVE INSTRUCTION & CLASSROOM POLICY

I do not discriminate in any way on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, disability, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression or national origin in my instruction or in the classroom.  My policy is designed to create a safe and productive learning environment for all students.